The NBJC Blog

Growing up, as a child you're told what your gender is from birth, and what roles are associated with that. with that in mind I recall playing this game as a child called house. The rules and the roles, in the game of house were already defined and were gender specific. 

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  • 2019 has already seen at least 18 transgender people fatally shot or killed by other violent means. As HRC continues to work toward justice and equality for transgender people, we mourn those we have lost: 
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On Thursday, August 15th Sephora announced the launch of the We Belong: Color Up Close campaign, recognizing their commitment to build a community where diversity is expected and all are welcomed.  The campaign also encourages more conversations on inclusion. To strive for sustained inclusion and diversity, the campaign commits to support immediate internal improvements to positively impact the industry at-large. 

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The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) is soliciting applications from interested interns and fellows desiring to learn about and lead in the movement to improve the lives of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and same gender loving (SGL) people. The internship/fellowship program provides a unique opportunity to students, and young and emerging professionals, interested in civil rights and LGBTQ equality to explore the unique intersections between and among these related efforts.

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In the Old Testament, the children of Israel asked Micah, “What does the Lord require of us?” Micah responds, very simply by saying, “...“To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.” It is this idea of acting justly that should call faith communities, specifically Black faith communities, to support full passage of the Equality Act.

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I want to begin by thanking you, Congresswoman Watson Coleman, for your leadership and vision in establishing the Congressional Black Caucus Taskforce on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health.

I am humbled and honored to be on this panel and to lead the work of the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC). NBJC is the nation’s only civil rights organization uniquely and unapologetically focused on the intersections of racial justice and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and same gender loving (LGBTQ/SGL) equality.

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“Students who do not feel safe and affirmed cannot be expected to demonstrate what they know and learn. This is not new news. We know that when students are not supported they disengage and dropout, which can impact life opportunities and future ability to earn money,” said David Johns, Executive Director of the National Black Justice Coalition. “In honor of Nigel, Jamel, Carl and so many other babies whose names we may never know, we need to act urgently to address the trauma, stress, and mental health needs of children, youth and young adults, especially those from racial and sexual minority communities.”

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The image of rural America is often white, working class, and socially conservative — and most definitely not where lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and same-gender loving people live.  This mental picture is largely reflected in the media and in popular depictions of rural America, but the reality is that millions of people of color — including Black, Latinx, Native, Asian, Middle Eastern, and multiracial people — live in rural United States, and many of them are LGBTQ/SGL. 

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This year ushered in the most diverse set of Congressional representatives ever. We’ve celebrated historic firsts, like the first Queer woman of color, Rep. Sharice Davids (D-Kan.), who is also one of the first two indigenous women in Congress. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) became the first openly bisexual member of the Senate. Rep. Jennifer Wexton (D-Va.) proudly displays a Transgender pride flag outside her office in support of the Trans community. With representation comes the promise of a voice, the promise of change.

 

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"We recognize those we have lost to the HIV/AIDS epidemic and acknowledge the work still required to end the epidemic. Today, given scientific, medical, and social advancements no one has to die as a result of HIV/AIDS.  Ending the epidemic in our lifetime is not a question of resources but a question of will. Will we fight to ensure that those most neglected and ignored receive the health care and legal protections we all need to thrive?

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